Avoid or Slow Dementia by Building Cognitive Reserve

 

 

 

Nothing can cure or slow Alzheimer’s disease—but, what if there was a way to stave off its effects on a person’s memory and cognition?

 

 

 

 

 

Cognitive Reserve

 

Scientists have discovered a biological mechanism, called, ‘cognitive reserve,’ that allows the brain to retain its functionality despite the onset of Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

The concept of a cognitive reserve arose from the observations of several independent research studies. Researchers found that certain seniors with normal, or minimally-impaired, mental functioning, actually had physical signs of pronounced Alzheimer’s disease in their brains. It was concluded that something was protecting these seniors from the effects memory-robbing disease.

Gary Small, M.D., professor of psychiatry and director of the UCLA Longevity Center, likens cognitive reserve to, “having an extra mental battery.” He says that a person with a high amount of cognitive reserve can compensate, somewhat, for the brain damage caused by disease and old age.

 

 

Hope for a damaged brain

 

As a person’s brain ages, several things begin to happen that can negatively impact their ability to think and remember, according to Small.

Brain cells begin to die, neurotransmitters don’t work as well as they did when the person was young, tissues shrink, and protein deposits begin to build-up, interfering with communication between cells (Alzheimer’s disease).

One by one, the biological ‘batteries’ powering a person’s thoughts and memories begin to wear out.

And, in the elderly, dementia is often irreversible.

There are instances where a senior may exhibit signs of mental impairment due to drug interactions or low levels of certain nutrients. These can sometimes be remedied by switching a prescription, or tweaking a diet. But, there is often very little that can be done for a senior who starts losing their memory due to ailments, like Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, or Lewy Body dementia.

This is why the concept of cognitive reserve is so promising—its protective effects are thought to be capable of being harnessed by anyone, no matter what the reason for their cognitive impairment.

 

 

Building up and tearing down

 

Collecting diplomas is one of the main ways a person can build solid base of cognitive reserve. According to Small—the amount of education a person has, particularly from the undergraduate level and up—helps fortify them against symptoms of memory loss and confusion.

 

 

The Alzheimer's Prevention Program: Keep Your Brain Healthy for the Rest of Your Life by [Small, Gary, Vorgan, Gigi]

 

But those who decided to forgo getting their master’s need not worry. Education is not the only way to fortify the brain against memory impairment.

Small says learning new things and doing mental exercises to help remember names and faces can also help beef up a person’s cognitive reserve. In his book, “The Alzheimer’s Prevention Program,” Small describes one such exercise: LOOK, SNAP, CONNECT.

Designed to help a person remember and associate names with faces, this exercise instructs people to concentrate on a new acquaintance’s name (LOOK), take a mental snapshot of their name and face (SNAP), and then synthesize the mental pictures to link the acquaintance’s name and face in their mind (CONNECT).

 

Sue Maxwell, M.S.W., director of Older Adult Services at Lee Memorial Health System, feels that simple lifestyle changes can also help a person’s mind become less susceptible to dementia. “Pretend you’re in a world where there are no paper and pencils—you have to remember things on your own,” she says.

Research has also linked being socially active to having a larger cognitive reserve.

There are certain things experts believe may hinder or deplete a person’s mental power cache.

Chronic stress and a sedentary lifestyle are proven brain-drainers. Scientific evidence indicates that stress may as much as double a person’s risk for developing Alzheimer’s.

 

 

A healthier brain at any age

 

When it comes to cultivating a healthy brain, “It’s never too late, and never too early to start,” Small says.

There are benefits to starting sooner, but evidence indicates that people can still enhance their brain functioning even when given a short period of time. According to Small, dramatic improvements in cognitive ability have been seen in people in their 60s, 70s, and 80s who adopt a program to stave off dementia.

Doctors even recommend that people who already have signs of cognitive impairment should try to stay as mentally active as possible.

 

 

Every little bit helps

 

What constitutes a mentally engaging activity will vary, depending on a person’s level of cognitive impairment.

Small says that any type of stimulation helps, and a caregiver may have to adjust an activity’s level of difficulty to fit a senior’s capability. For example, if your elderly loved one enjoys reading, but can no longer handle adult books due to their dementia, they may need to downgrade to a children’s book.

 

Here are a few examples of easily-modifiable activities that may be good for seniors with Alzheimer’s:

 

1. Stick to simple pleasures – Keeping things simple and straightforward is often the best course of action when coming up with activities for people with Alzheimer’s. Going to a local park to feed the birds and fish is an easy task that may be very fun for a person with Alzheimer’s.

 

 

You can also take turns reading a favorite book aloud. This can be an easy way to encourage a senior to exercise their mind while giving them the pleasure of reading a beloved book.

 

2. Listen to music – Research has shown that listening to music can help a person with Alzheimer’s remember events, people, and places from their past. Additionally, music can be a way to get a senior moving through dance or song.

 

 

3. Cook and clean – You can turn mundane, daily tasks into activities that a person with Alzheimer’s can help with. Even if they just help with measuring ingredients, having a senior help you cook a family recipe can be a fun way for both of you to spend some time together. An elderly loved one might also be able to help you do things around the house like dusting or folding laundry.

 

 

4. Work up a sweat – Exercise provides countess benefits to all seniors, regardless of whether or not they have Alzheimer’s. Workouts can consist of everything from talking a walk around the block to taking a yoga-for-seniors class.

 

5. Play a game – While you probably don’t want to start a game of Risk with your elderly loved one, it’s possible to make an entertaining, personal game out of things lying around the house. Sorting through old family photos is a good way to help an elderly loved one remember special events and people from their past. You can even turn a routine trip to the grocery store into a scavenger hunt where you and your loved one search for particular items on a list.

 

Recommended: Match the Shapes For Dementia and Alzheimer’s

 

  • Designed specifically for people with dementia – age appropriate, not childish. No mention of “dementia” or “Alzheimer’s” on the product or packaging
  • 36 brightly colored tiles draw people’s attention
  • Colored templates help the person be successful
  • Tested with people at various stages of dementia to ensure that it is well-suited, and enjoyed
  • Full instructions detail how to present the activity to ensure that the person feels a sense of satisfaction and accomplishment

 

 

6. Volunteer – Devoting time to helping other people can provide immense satisfaction to both you and your elderly loved one. Volunteering can involve something as simple as collecting things like school supplies, toys, canned goods, etc., and taking them to a local shelter or food bank. Seniors who can’t leave the house could help by sorting, wrapping, or taking inventory of collected goods.

 

These activities will require varying levels of patience on the part of the caregiver. A loved one with Alzheimer’s will not be able to perform tasks perfectly, if at all, and seniors are likely to get frustrated is an activity is too difficult. It will take constant trial and error to create and modify activities to meet an elder’s shifting capabilities.

The existence of cognitive reserve is not yet a well-researched concept and no one is sure of exactly how effective it is at warding off dementia in the elderly. Existing evidence suggests that having an extra cognitive stash is beneficial. But, the advantages can vary from person to person, and generally diminish as their dementia progresses.

Still, Maxwell says that there are proven things people can do to protect their aging brain.

The key, according to Small, is coming up with a plan and sticking to it.

A combination of a healthy brain diet (full of antioxidant-rich fruits and veggies and fish as well as nuts that contain omega-3 fats), exercise, stress management, and mental stimulation will help a caregiver and their elderly loved one preserve their cognitive capacity.

 

Recommended: Genius Brain Power

 

Why Genius Brain Power Is Your Ultimate Self Mastery Tool Kit

The highly advanced entrainment technology used in the Genius Brain Power system is far more effective than offerings in much higher priced products, mainly because other companies use a very old type of Brainwave Entrainment that was discovered 150 years ago, called binaural beats.

Those less effective binaural beats send differently pitched frequencies into each ear to get your brain to “do math” and entrain to the difference between the two pitches.  Binaural beats were a great discovery, but many people don’t respond very well to this method of entrainment. 

 

Genius Brain Power uses a far superior, much more modern brainwave entrainment technology.

 

Brain Wave Entrainment Increases Intelligence

 

Utilizing computer generated, rhythmically pulsed beats (known as Isochronic beats), Genius Brain Power easily guides your brain into optimal frequencies for rocketing your IQ, deep relaxation, peak mental efficiency and much more…

The biggest of many advantages Genius Brain Power (GBP) has over binaural beats is that the brain doesn’t adapt to GBP’s rhythmic tones over time and ignore them, like it does with binaurals. This means GBP will continue to give you results for years, so you can keep improving your brain without having to buy more products.

Rhythmic frequencies are the basis of how the brain operates, so your brain is guaranteed to respond to Genius Brain Power’s pulsed brainwave rhythms. 

With these audible, computer generated pulsed tones, the brain is safely, gently and effectively guided to entrain to your most optimal brainwave frequencies.  These tones need to be audible, so you will hear them along with the music in the Genius Brain Power package.

 

Brainwave entrainment lights up your brain

The main thing you should remember here is that rhythm is one of the most basic functions in the human brain, so everyone’s brain responds to rhythm, including yours.

The brain’s natural response to “follow” or “entrain” to certain types of rhythms, coupled with my years of experience creating brainwave entrainment audio tracks has led to this breakthrough technology that I could only be  called “Genius Brain Power” because no other description really comes close.

 

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