Make A Living Will Today

What is a Living Will or Healthcare Directive

And  Do You Need One?

http://www.lawdepot.ca/contracts/living-will-personal-directive/?pid=pg-R4A3Y9OYQP-living-will-personal-directivetextlink&ldcn=healthdir&loc=CA

 

Prepare for unforeseen circumstances to save yourself and your family needless pain.

We have all heard stories of people who, because of a terrible accident or illness, become unable to make health care decisions for themselves. It may happen gradually, when someone develops dementia, for example. If he or she did not previously designate another person to do so, the matter can end up in the courts.

Having a health care power of attorney  is the best way to make sure that your wishes are followed and that you receive the level of care you choose.

In this video by Milwaukee Public Television, attorney Betsy Abramson, deputy director of the Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging, offers pointers on how you can put your mind at ease by filling out the vital paperwork.

 

Living Will states your wishes regarding life support in the event that you cannot communicate your end-of-life wishes yourself. Your Living Will only comes into effect if you are in a persistent vegetative state or irreversible coma and can no longer make and communicate your own wishes. A Living Will spares your family the anguish of making life-support decisions without your input. A Living Will also ensures that your doctor understands your end-of-life wishes and treats you accordingly.

Living Wills can be very specific or very general. Living Wills that are too general may not provide sufficient direction and serve only to create confusion and conflict between medical personnel, your health care agent, and your loved ones. More specific Living Wills are preferred. These are shown to be most successful when they include informed, thoughtful reflection on your wishes and values supported by personal communication between you and your health care agent before a medical crisis occurs.

Recently, Living Wills have moved away from focusing on specific treatments and medical procedures to focus on patient values, personal goals, and health outcome states. For example, a Living Will might: designate an agent to make care decisions; dictate what kind of life support treatment that patient does or does not want; discuss pain management, personal grooming and bathing instructions; address how the patient wants to be treated, including religious, spiritual, and emotional support; and detail funeral or memorial plans.

Choosing an Agent for Your Living Will

http://www.lawdepot.ca/contracts/living-will-personal-directive/?pid=pg-R4A3Y9OYQP-living-will-personal-directivetextlink&ldcn=healthdir&loc=CA

When you become unable to make medical decisions for yourself, the power to make life-support decisions for you is transferred to the person you designate as your agent in your Living Will or Health Care Power of Attorney. 

This person must act according to the directives set out in that document. The person that you designate as your agent should be someone you know and trust. Some states refer to the agent as an “attorney-in-fact,” “health care agent,” “health care proxy,” “health care representative,” “patient advocate,” “proxy” or “surrogate.”

The statutes of most states require that your agent be an adult. In addition, under most circumstances, your agent cannot be your health care provider (for example, a physician, nurse, employee, officer, director, or operator of a home health agency, hospital, nursing home, or residential care facility) unless that person is related to you. In selecting an agent for your Living Will, you should not designate a person who is, or may become, directly involved in providing health care to you unless that person is your spouse or a family member.

Make sure your agent is willing to assume responsibility for your medical decision making. If she agrees to be your proxy, talk with her about your values, beliefs and desires. Good health care agents are able to separate their own feelings from yours and your wishes, but may feel guilt and anguish at having to make such difficult end-of-life decisions. Communicating early and often with your agent can help ensure that both you and your agent are comfortable and at peace with your life-support wishes.

http://www.lawdepot.ca/contracts/living-will-personal-directive/?pid=pg-R4A3Y9OYQP-living-will-personal-directivetextlink&ldcn=healthdir&loc=CA

Choose just one person to serve as your agent at a given time to avoid conflicts. But choose an alternate agent in case the primary agent is not available. Once you have selected an agent, make sure they get a copy of your Living Will, and tell your family and physician whom you’ve selected.

Many individuals give their health care agents broad authority to override their written Living Will. Other individuals give the written Living Will priority. Make sure to articulate which instruction to follow when there is a conflict between your agent and your Living Will.

 

Summary For Americans:

http://cf.ltkcdn.net/kids/images/std/91851-425x317-americanflag.jpg

Create your US Citizen Living Will today.  Call your lawyer or prepare one simply and inexpensively yourself online at Law Depot.

What is a Living Will?

A Living Will lets you specify your choices for medical treatment. A Living Will documents your preferences for the time when you are no longer able to communicate or provide consent.

What is a Medical Power of Attorney?

A Medical Power of Attorney allows you to designate someone (your Agent) to make health care decisions for you when you are no longer able to do so.

What are my rights?

If you have a Living Will, the decisions made by your Agent will be constrained by that document. The Medical Power of Attorney is useful for those issues that are not covered by your Living Will. In those cases, your Agent can ensure the intent of your wishes are followed.

The U.S. Constitution allows people to determine the kind of health care they will receive. However, many states limit the types of health care decisions that can be made, and the instructions that you provide below may go beyond what is allowed in your state. This will not invalidate your instructions, but your health care providers may be limited to what is legally permitted.

 

Summary For Canadians:

http://www.ctvnews.ca/polopoly_fs/1.2237377.1424029075!/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_960/image.jpg

Create your Canadian Citizen Living Will today.  Call your lawyer, or prepare one inexpensively yourself online at Law Depot.

What is a Representation Agreement?

A Personal Directive or Living Will allows you to designate someone who will make health care and personal care decisions for you when you are not able and also to provide instructions for future care while you are still capable of making decisions for yourself.  A Personal Directive provides an opportunity for you to discuss treatment options with your medical staff as well as to discuss and resolve difficult issues with your family and friends.  Your directive must be made while you are still capable of giving consent.  Note that a Personal Directive is also called a Living Will, Advance Directive, Health Care Directive, or Power of Attorney for personal care.

Every adult who is 19 years of age or older is presumed to be capable of making, changing or revoking a representation agreement, and making decisions about personal care, health care and legal matters and about the adult’s financial affairs, business and assets.In addition the following will apply:

  • You must be mentally competent.
  • You must be fully informed of your treatment options for all possible medical outcomes.
  • You should not be unduly influenced by anyone else during your decision making process.

Who can write a Heath Care Directive?

Every adult who is 19 years of age or older is presumed to be capable of making, changing or revoking a representation agreement, and making decisions about personal care, health care and legal matters and about the adult’s financial affairs, business and assets.In addition the following will apply:

  • You must be mentally competent.
  • You must be fully informed of your treatment options for all possible medical outcomes.
  • You should not be unduly influenced by anyone else during your decision making process.

Other Countries:

Create your  UK Living Will Today.

About this blog

 

Do Not Resuscitate

http://images.medicaldaily.com/sites/medicaldaily.com/files/styles/headline/public/2014/09/05/dnr.jpg

 

A “do not resuscitate” (DNR) order indicates that a person — usually with a terminal illness or other serious medical condition — has decided not to have cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attempted in the event his or her heart or breathing stops. In most situations, a DNR order is written by a physician after discussing the burdens and benefits of CPR with the patient or the patient’s surrogate decision maker.

Why would a person sign such an order?

At some point for late stage terminally ill patients, CPR will not be life-saving, and will only cause harm. If the physicians caring for you or your loved one believe strongly that this is the case, they will discuss with you why it is not being offered as an option.  Various methods of CPR often involve more than chest compressions and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. CPR also might include the use of powerful drugs or electric shock to start the heart beating again, or might require the insertion of a breathing tube. Although CPR can save lives, it frequently does not work. Even if a person is resuscitated, he or she might suffer painful injuries during CPR or might be left in a worse condition than before. Also, people with terminal illnesses or other serious medical conditions might not want to have CPR performed on them, even if that means they might die as a result.

Some people believe that CPR offers hope. Such hope, however, is not useful if there’s no chance of restoring heart function. The resuscitation procedure is complex, costly, labor intensive (involving many health care providers), and causes physical damage to the patient. Such a demanding procedure should not be performed when there’s no chance of success.

http://static01.nyt.com/images/2012/09/05/us/jp-CARDIAC/jp-CARDIAC-articleLarge.jpg

Physicians are not obliged to provide treatment that can’t possibly work, and the ethics of doing so are questionable. For example, a surgeon can’t be expected to perform surgery that has no chance of success; a physician can’t be obliged to prescribe medication whose use is not supported by evidence.

If you or a loved one are facing a life limiting condition, chances are that you will be asked to sign a DNR order at some point.  My father was asked to sign a DNR order for my Mom, who had late stage liver disease.  The doctor explained it as deciding not to perform heroic measures in an attempt to restart the heart and breathing, as attempts to restore heart function in a person dying from a progressive terminal condition rarely work and often just cause damage.  It is difficult but important to understand that cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rarely works in these circumstances because the heart has stopped from the burden of illness on the entire body and not due to a problem with the heart itself.

Discussing resuscitation decisions can be very difficult.  Often if feels unnatural not to do anything and everything to prolong life.   Open and honest communication with the medical team is essential, as are having all the facts. 

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-7igYlEigHQg/UDaWbHFei_I/AAAAAAAAA4g/fIDlWiFVrIc/s1600/DoctorBadNews.jpg

It is not honest to offer CPR as an intervention that offers hope in the end stages of a terminal illness, and  therefore, it may not be offered by your physician.  If there is a disagreement among the patient, their family and the health care team, it would be a good idea to obtain a second opinion from another physician.  If the second physician doesn’t support the first physician’s decision, then care may be transferred to the second physician.

Finally, remember that CPR is a vigorous emergency procedure and it is not always successful. Experience has shown that CPR does not restore breathing and heart function in patients who have widespread cancer, widespread infection or other terminal illness.

Please share your thought on DNR orders in the comments below.

About this blog